Racist Democrats After 1964


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Premise: One of the most effective tactics creeple use for directing sheeple paranoia is the use of mass propaganda. As we saw on the page, Everett Dirksen Vs. The Democratic Party freeple Republican Senate leader Everett Dirksen led the legislative fight for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 which essentially removed the last vestiges of government sanctioned segregation that had been implemented by the Democratic Party as the Jim Crow Laws around the turn of the twentieth century. Dirksen’s perseverance along with Republican Party support was hailed by the mainstream media, black media, black civil rights organizations, Martin Luther King, and President Lyndon Johnson as the predominant reason for its passage. However, creeple Democrats today claim that it was they who brought about the civil rights reforms of the 1960s, while freeple Republicans were supposedly the racists who opposed them, even though it was Democrats who created the Southern Manifesto against civil rights reform, it was Democrats who had watered down similar civil rights bills in both 1957 and 1960, and it was Democrats who formed the infamous Southern Bloc to stop the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Question: Have creeple Democrats ever produced a list of freeple Republicans who supposedly opposed the civil rights movement because they were racist? There may have been a handful of creeple Republicans, but I’ve never seen a list. Republican presidential candidate Barry Goldwater (and his supporters) objected to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on constitutional grounds, not based on any racism. Goldwater had desegregated his own department store. Goldwater had funded anti-segregation legal challenges. Goldwater was a founding member of the Arizona NAACP. Goldwater fully supported the 1957 and 1960 civil rights bill attempts. Goldwater also supported a ban on the race-based poll tax (which came about in the Voter Rights Act of 1965). Does this sound like a man who wanted to stop civil rights for blacks? Goldwater didn’t want to kill the civil rights act – he was holding out for a better bill. And when it passed Goldwater promised Everett Dirksen that he would fully implement the new bill if elected President.

List: Included on this page is a list of racist creeple Democrats who (unlike Barry Goldwater) are on the public record opposing the civil rights movement at the time. Most voted against either the civil rights acts and/or for the segregationist Southern Manifesto or otherwise publicly opposed the civil rights movement.

Racist Democrats Opposed to Civil Rights
Watkins Abbitt, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1973)
Thomas Abernethy, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1973)
Carl Albert, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1976)
Hugh Alexander, Senate counsel (Democrat, in office until 1976)
Dale Alford, U.S. Representative, Arkansas (Democrat, in office until 1963)
George Andrews, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1971)
Robert Ashmore, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1969)
Taddy Aycock, Lieutenant Governor, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1972)
Graham Arthur Barden, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1960)
Walter Baring, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1973)
Ross Barnett, Governor, Mississippi (Democrat, in office until 1964)
Ross Bass, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1966)
Lindley Beckworth, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1968)
Charles Bennett, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1993)
Iris Blitch, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1963)
Hale Boggs, U.S. Representative, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1973)
Herbert Bonner, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1965)
Albert Boutwell, Lieutenant Governor, Alabama (Democrat, in office until 1967)
Frank William Boykin, Sr., U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1963)
Parey Branton, State Representative, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1990)
Jack Brooks, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1994)
Overton Brooks, U.S. Representative, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1961)
Paul Brown, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1960)
Joel Broyhill, U.S. Representative, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1974)
C. Farris Bryant, Governor, Florida (Democrat, in office until 1965)
Garland T. Byrd, Lieutenant Governor, Georgia (Democrat, in office until 1963)
Harry F. Byrd, Jr., U.S. Senator, Virginia (Democrat, in office until 1983)
Robert Byrd, U.S. Senator, West Virginia (Democrat, in office until 2010)
Omar Burleson, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1978)
Frank Carlyle, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1956)
Robert Casey, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1976)
Frank Chelf, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1967)
Francis Cherry, Governor, Arkansas (Democrat, in office until 1955)
William Colmer, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1973)
Harold Cooley, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1966)
Jere Cooper, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1957)
Kent Courtney, activist from Louisiana (Democrat)
Price Daniel, Associate Justice, Texas (Democrat, in office until 1978)
Clifford Davis, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1965)
James C. Davis, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1963)
Jimmie Davis, Governor, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1964)
John Davis, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1975)
Vail M. Delony, Speaker, LA House of Rep. (Democrat, in office until 1967)
Martin Dies, Jr., U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1959)
William Dorn, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1975)
John Dowdy, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1973)
Thomas Downing, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1977)
Carl Durham, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1960)
James Eastland, U.S. Senator, Mississippi (Democrat, in office until 1978)
Allen J. Ellender, U.S. Senator, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1972)
Carl Elliott, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1965)
Samuel James Ervin Jr., U.S. Senator, N.C. (Democrat, in office until 1974)
Samuel Ervin, U.S. Senator (Democrat, in office until 1974)
Robert Everett, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1971)
Joseph Evins, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1977)
Clyde Fant, Mayor of Shreveport, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1970)
Dante Fascell, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1993)
Orval Faubus, Governor, Arkansas (Democrat, in office until 1967)
Ovie Fisher, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1974)
John Flynt, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1979)
Elijah Forrester, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1965)
Lawrence Fountain, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1983)
James Frazier, Jr. U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1963)
William Fulbright, U.S. Senator, Arkansas (Democrat, in office until 1974)
Don Fuqua, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1987)
John Sidney Garrett, State Rep., Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1972)
Julian Gary, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1965)
Ezekiel Gathings, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1969)
Peter Zack Geer, Lieutenant Governor, Georgia (Democrat, in office until 1967)
Walter F. George, U.S. Senator (Democrat, in office until 1957)
Sam Gibbons, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1997)
Al Gore Sr., U.S. Senator (Democrat, in office until 1971)
George Grant, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1964)
James H. Gray, Sr., Georgia, Party state chairman (Democrat)
Noble Gregory, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1958)
Jack P.F. Gremillion, Attorney General (Democrat, in office until 1972)
Marvin Griffin, Governor, Georgia (Democrat, in office until 1959)
George Hagan, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1973)
James Haley, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1977)
Porter Hardy, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1969)
Oren Harris, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1976)
Burr Harrison, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1963)
Brooks Hays, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1959)
F. Edward Hebert, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1977)
Jesse Helms, U.S. Senator, North Carolina (Democrat, in office until 1970)
Robert Hemphill, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1964)
David Henderson, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1976)
Albert Herlong, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1969)
Joseph Hill, U.S. Senator (Democrat, in office until 1968)
Lister Hill, U.S. Senator, Alabama (Democrat, in office until 1969)
Spessard Holland, U.S. Senator, Florida (Democrat, in office until 1971)
Ernest Hollings, Governor, South Carolina, (Democrat, in office until 2005)
George Huddleston, Jr., U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1964)
William Hull, Jr., U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1972)
Frank Ikard, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1962)
Wellborn Jack, State Representative, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1964)
Shelby M. Jackson, Superintendent Education (Democrat, in office until 1964)
John Jarman, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1977)
William Jennings, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1967)
James D. Johnson, AK Supreme Court justice (Democrat, in office until 1966)
Lyndon B. Johnson, U.S. Senator (Democrat, in office until 1969)
Paul B. Johnson, Jr., Governor, Mississippi (Democrat, in office until 1968)
J. Bennett Johnston, Jr., U.S. Senator, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1997)
Olin Johnston, U.S. Senator, South Carolina (Democrat, in office until 1965)
Paul Jones, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1969)
Woodrow Jones, judge (Democrat, in office until 1985)
B. Everett Jordan, U.S. Senator, North Carolina (Democrat, in office until 1973)
Estes Kefauver, U.S. Senator, Tennessee (Democrat, in office until 1963)
Robert F. Kennon, Governor, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1956)
Paul Kilday, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1962)
Joe Kilgore, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1965)
James J. Kilpatrick, Columnist, Virginia (Democrat)
Alvin Kitchin, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1962)
Horace Kornegay, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1969)
Phillip Landrum, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1977)
Henderson Lanham, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1957)
Alton Lennon, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1973)
Earl Kemp Long, Governor, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1960)
George S. Long, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1958)
Gillis Long, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1985)
Russell B. Long, U.S. Senator, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1987)
Speedy O. Long, U.S. Representative, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1985)
Joseph Loser, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1962)
Lester Maddox, Governor, Georgia (Democrat, in office until 1975)
George Mahon, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1979)
John Marsh, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1989)
Billy Matthews, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1967)
John McClellan, U.S. Senator, Arkansas (Democrat, in office until 1977)
John McKeithen, Governor, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1972)
John McMillan, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1973)
Wilbur Mills, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1977)
Harold Montgomery, State Senator, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1976)
Danny Roy Moore, State Senator, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1968)
deLesseps Story Morrison, Mayor, New Orleans (Democrat, in office until 1961)
Toby Morris, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1960)
James Morrison, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1967)
Wayne Morse, U.S. Senator (Democrat, in office until 1968)
Thomas Murray, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1966)
William Natcher, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1994)
William Norrell, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1961)
W. Lee O’Daniel, U.S. Senator, Texas (Democrat, in office until 1949)
Otto Passman, U.S. Representative, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1977)
John Patman, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1976)
John Malcolm Patterson, Governor, Alabama (Democrat, in office until 1963)
Dave L. Pearce, Agricultural Commissioner (Democrat, in office until 1976)
Leander Perez, Louisiana judge (Democrat)
John Pilcher, U.S. Representative, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1965)
William Poage, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1978)
Richard Poff, Associate Justice (Democrat, in office until 1988)
Joe Pool, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1968)
Prince Preston, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1960)
Graham Purcell, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1973)
William M. Rainach, State Senator, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1960)
Albert Rains, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1965)
John Rarick, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1975)
James Richards, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1957)
John Riley, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1962)
Lucius Rivers, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1970)
Herbert Roberts, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1981)
Kenneth Roberts, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1965)
A. Willis Robertson, U.S. Senator, Virginia (Democrat, in office until 1966)
Edward Robeson, Jr., U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1959)
Paul Rogers, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1979)
Walter Rogers, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1967)
Richard B. Russell, U.S. Senator, Georgia (Democrat, in office until 1971)
T. Rutherford, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1962)
Victor Schiro, Mayor, New Orleans (Democrat, in office until 1970)
Ralph Scott, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1966)
W. Kerr Scott, U.S. Senator, N.C. (Democrat, in office until 1958)
Armistead Selden, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1969)
George A. Shuford, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1959)
Robert Sikes, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1979)
George Smathers, U.S. Senate, Florida (Democrat, in office until 1969)
Frank Smith, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1962)
Gerald L. K. Smith, evangelist from Louisiana and Arkansas (Democrat)
Howard W. Smith, U.S. Representative, Virginia (Democrat, in office until 1967)
John Sparkman, U.S. Senator, Alabama (Democrat, in office until 1979)
Brent Spence, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1962)
Thomas Steed, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1980)
John C. Stennis, U.S. Senator, Mississippi (Democrat, in office until 1989)
Robert Stephens, Jr., U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1977)
Ford E. Stinson, State Representative, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1972)
J. B. Stoner, Georgia political candidate (Democrat)
Frank Stubblefield, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1974)
Herman Talmadge, U.S. Senator, Georgia (Democrat, in office until 1981)
Roy Taylor, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1977)
Olin Teague, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1978)
Albert Thomas, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1966)
A. Roswell Thompson, Louisiana political candidate (Democrat)
Clark Thompson, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1966)
Theo Thompson, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1965)
William Thornberry, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1964)
Strom Thurmond, U.S. Senator, S.C. (Democrat, in office until 1964)
Ned Touchstone, Louisiana journalist and printer (Democrat)
James Trimble, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1967)
William Tuck, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1969)
James Tuten, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1967)
Carl Vinson, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1965)
Joe D. Waggonner, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1979)
George C. Wallace, Governor, Alabama (Democrat, in office until 1987)
Herbert Walters, U.S. Senate, Tennessee, (Democrat, in office until 1964)
Albert W. Watson, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1971)
John Watts, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1971)
Basil Whitener, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1969)
Jamie Whitten, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1995)
John Williams, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1972)
John Bell Williams, Governor, Mississippi (Democrat, in office until 1972)
Edwin E. Willis, U.S. Representative, Louisiana (Democrat, in office until 1969)
William Winstead, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1965)
James Wright, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1989)
John Young, U.S. Representative (Democrat, in office until 1979)

Some creeple today will belatedly admit that it was Southern Democrats who mostly opposed the civil rights movement, but then they claim that what has been dubbed Richard Nixon’s “Southern strategy” brought over all of the racist Democrats into the Republican Party in the 1968 presidential election. Except that there was no migration of Southern racists into the Republican Party via this so-called “Southern strategy”. As can be seen in the accompanying 1968 election map the Democratic Party held Texas, while five other prominent Southern states voted for the renegade Democrat segregationist, George Wallace.

1968 Election Map

There was no evidence of a so-called “Southern strategy” in the 1968 presidential election. Racist Southern Democrats did not migrate to the Republican Party.

Nixon supported all five of the civil rights acts, including the Civil Rights Act of 1968. Under Nixon as President the civil rights enforcement budget increased by 800 percent. Unprecedented numbers of blacks were added to the federal bureaucracy. Nixon created the Office of Minority Business Enterprise to help black’s create their own businesses. Federal dollars to black colleges doubled. When Nixon became President, only 10% of Southern schools were integrated – four years after Democrat Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964! When Nixon left office 70% were integrated. It was Richard Nixon who desegregated the Southern schools, not Lyndon Johnson.

1976 Election Maps

As can be seen in the above electoral maps, in 1976 the Democrats still dominated the South with dozens of incumbent racists who had opposed the civil rights movement re-elected to Congress – Carter won the presidency and the Democratic Party won Congress primarily because of Southern support. Even in the 1980 Reagan landslide, exit polls showed that old Southern whites (those most likely to be racist holdovers from the 1960s) voted for Carter, while young Southerners voted for Reagan. It was with this new generation of Southern voters and the dying off of older, racist Democratic voters, along with a demographic shift of Republicans from northern states to southern states that has established the Republican Party as the majority party in the South.

There was no exodus of Southern racist Democrats to the Republican Party. The same racist Democratic voters who supported these racist Democratic politicians, who are listed on this page and opposed the civil rights movement, continued to vote for them long afterwards. 139 of these Democratic incumbents held office into the late 1960s. 100 held office into the 1970s. 26 held office into the 1980s. 10 held office into the 1990s. And 2 held on right into the 2000s. Senator Robert Byrd was an “Exalted Cyclops” of the Ku Klux Klan, led the Democratic filibuster of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and later became the second highest ranking Democrat in the Senate while still publicly using the n-word in the 2000s. New Democratic candidates elected after 1964, for forty years still happily caucused with these racist, hanger-on Democratic incumbents who continued to court the same racist voters who elected them when they first opposed civil rights in the 1950s and 60s.

Questions: If Southern racist Democratic voters switched parties to become Republicans shortly after 1964 (as creeple now insist), how did these racist Democratic incumbents keep getting re-elected? Why weren’t they all turfed out in the 1964 election, or at least the 1966 or 1968 elections? Shouldn’t those 1976 electoral maps of the South be Republican red, and shouldn’t Republican candidate Gerald Ford have been easily elected President?

Selma 3

It was the racist attitude of Democrats listed on this page that led to violence in Selma, Alabama.

Selma 4

It was the Democratic Party who sicked the dogs on peaceful civil rights protesters.

Questions: Who was it that ordered to let loose the dogs at civil rights protests? Democratic Party creeple. Who was it that ordered fire hoses be turned on civil rights protests? Democratic Party creeple. Who was it that ordered the entrances to schools be blocked to black students? Democratic Party creeple. Who was it that ordered the police to attack the Selma protesters with tear gas, dogs and nightsticks? Democratic Party creeple.

Selma 2

It was Republicans who supported the civil rights movement. It was the Democrats listed on this page who opposed the civil right movement. And it was racist Democratic voters who kept re-electing these same racist Democratic incumbents over and over again. There are your real racists. Don’t listen to what creeple say – look at what they have done.

Explanation: Republican Party freeple abolished creeple slavery, abolished the creeple Jim Crow laws, and brought about the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 60s. Democratic Party creeple stubbornly opposed civil rights at the time, just as they had for previous decades and centuries.

Conclusion: Creeple propaganda has been very effective. You actually thought (as I did) that Democratic Party creeple supported the civil rights movement, when in fact, they resisted it as long as they possibly could, and then illegitimately proclaimed themselves as the champions of civil rights (while still courting the Southern racist vote). Creeple have kept you in the dark and fed you manure – are you feeling like a mushroom?


[This page is from The Paranoid Quiz website. To understand the context
take the quiz.]
Selma 1

It was the Democratic Party who was the party of slavery. It was the Democratic Party who was the party of segregation. It was the Democratic Party that opposed the civil rights movement. It was the Democratic Party who ordered the violence in Selma, Alabama.

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