Texas vs. California


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Real Ways To Reclaim Freedom For America
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Need and Demand: Here are two classic examples of states that illustrate the contrasting results of need and demand.

Premise: California is run by creeple. Texas is run by freeple. California rates fourth-highest of the 50 states in tax rates. Texas is fifth-lowest. From 2000 to 2013 job growth was 2.6% in California. In Texas job growth was 19.7%. Average cost of living adjusted wages in California equals $41,680 before taxes. In Texas it is $47,413. California has 42% more people living in poverty than Texas. CEOs rank California the worst state for business and Texas as the best.

Selection: You have been granted one magic wish for America. All states can have the economic, employment and poverty numbers of either California or Texas. Your choice. Which would you wish for?

Questions: Would you rather your state be run by freeplenomics or creeplenomics? Would you rather freeple or creeple run your state?

Conundrum: Creeple always tell you that if you only allow them to direct things, the results will be better – except they don’t want you to ever look at the numbers. They also don’t want you to know that people are moving out of creeple run states to freeple run states in droves.

[Your scoff reflex has probably been activated when you hear Texas. Why do you think that creeple demonize Texas? Because it puts the lie to creeplenomics in states like California.]

Explanation: It doesn’t matter whether the focus is the federal government or state governments. If creeple run them expect the same results associated with all big-mommy government interference in the marketplace – failure.

Conclusion: At a state level, freedom produces prosperity, while collectivism does not. If unrestrained government mommyism produced prosperity California would lead the nation, not trail it.

Need and Demand: California collectivism produces need. Texas freedom produces demand.


[This page is from The Paranoid Quiz website. To understand the context take the quiz.]
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